Plowing Forward: Montana Agriculture in a Changing Climate

Agriculture is consistently Montana’s largest economic sector, but as an arid state we need to prepare for the challenges brought on by changing weather patterns.  Yesterday, agricultural producers, scientists, special interest groups, lawmakers, and the general public came together at the Bozeman Public Library to talk about the future of climate change and what it means for people in the agricultural industry and research sector.  The event was organized by Plowing Forward, a collaborative group to coordinate local Ag. education efforts.

“If you’ve eaten today, then you’re involved in agriculture.”  -Chris Christiaens at the Plowing Forward meeting in Bozeman, MT, Feb 10, 2017

Opening remarks were led by Chris Christiaens, lobbyist and Project Specialist for the Montana Farmers Union, based in Great Falls, MT. Chris gave us some perspective on how Montana farming and ranching has changed over time, especially over the last 10 years,including changes to the growing season, harvest times, water usage, the types of plants which are able to survive here.  He reminded us that the effect of climate on agriculture affects all of us.

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Chris Christiaens, Project Specialist for Montana Farmers Union.

Next, we heard from Montana’s Senator Jon Tester, who runs a farm in northern Montana that has been in his family since 1912.  The Senator spoke to his personal experiences with farming and how his management practices had adapted over the years to deal with changing temperature and water conditions.  Importantly, he spoke about how agriculture is a central industry to the United States in ways that will become even more apparent in the coming years as the negative effects of climate change affect more and more areas.  Food security, a peaceful way of life, and economic vitality (not just in Montana or the United States, but globally), were contingent upon supporting agricultural production under adverse events.  He assured agricultural stakeholders that he continues to support production, research, and education, including the work we do in the laboratory as well as out in the field to promote agriculture.

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Montana Senator Jon Tester

Next, we heard from three professors from Montana State University.  Dr. Cathy Whitlock, a Professor of Earth Sciences, who is also the Director for the MSU Institute on Ecosystems, and a Lead Coordinator for the Montana Climate Assessment.  The Montana Climate Assessment seeks to assemble past and current research on Montana climate in order to assess trends, make predictions about the future, and help both researchers and producers to tailor their efforts based on what is happening at the regional level.  The Assessment is scheduled for release in August, 2017, and will allow for faster dissemination of research information online.

Dr. Whitlock’s introduction to the MCA was continued by  Dr. Bruce Maxwell, a Professor of Agroecology, as well as the Agriculture Sector Lead for the Montana Climate Assessment.  He summarized current research on the present water availability in Montana, as well as what we might see in the future.  He warned that drier summers were likely, and while winters may get wetter, if they continue to get warmer that snow runoff will flow into rivers before the ground has thawed.  This means snow melt will flow out of the region more quickly and not be added to local ground water sources for use here.  To paraphrase Bruce, a longer growing season does you no good if you don’t have any water.

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Dr. Bruce Maxwell, Montana State University

We also heard from my current post-doctoral advisor, Dr. Fabian Menalled, Professor of Weed Ecology Management and Cropland Weed Specialist (Extension).  He presented some of the results from our ongoing project at Fort Ellis on the interactions between climate change (hot and dry conditions), farm management system (conventional or organic), disease status, and weed competition on wheat production.  Increased temperatures and decreased moisture reduced wheat production but increased the amount of cheatgrass (downy brome), a weed which competes with wheat and can reduce wheat growth.  My work on the soil bacterial diversity under these conditions didn’t make it into the final presentation, though.  I have only just begun the data analysis, which will take me several months due to the complexity of our treatments, but here is a teaser: we know very little about soil bacteria, and the effects we are seeing are not exactly what we predicted!

Here is the video of Dr. Menalled’s presentation (just under 9 minutes):

Lastly, we heard from a local producer who spoke to his experience with ranching on a farm that had been run continuously for well over 100 years.  His talk reflected the prevailing sentiment of the presentations: that farm practices had changed over the last few decades and people in agriculture were already responding to climate change, even if previously they wouldn’t put a name to it.  The presentations concluded with a question and answer session with the entire panel, as well as a reminder that we all have the right and the obligation to be invested in our food system.  Whether we grow produce or raise livestock for ourselves or others, whether we research these biological interactions, whether we set the policy that affects an entire industry, or whether we are just a consumer, we owe it to ourselves to get involved and make sure our voice is heard.  To that end, I wrote a letter to my legislators (pictured below), and in the next few weeks I’ll be writing posts about how I participate in science (and agriculture) on the local and national level.

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Make your voice heard.

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